Thursday, July 20, 2017

thirteenth post

A Review of the 2012 movie "The Hunt"

"The Hunt" is a weird movie where the entire time I spent like a horror movie yelling at the screen "don't open that door!" I guess I have the mistaken view that I know about how to handle traumatic situations but I think the best thing would be to get the authorities involved, immediately, for the main character's case. I suppose the ideas of justice I'm most readily pushing forward involve social workers.

The movie would instead put the onus of its social critique on the individuals of a upper-class gang of parents who turn to violence after a mistaken case of sexual violence against their children emerges. It is such the case that we see people caught in the moral division between believing a friend and rightfully setting up boundaries in such a situation. The tragedy pretty much stems, in my analysis, from the fact that those boundaries were not properly dealt with, the social contract with these things being not popularly understood at all.

The movie really though moves beyond all that by moving ahead in time in segments of a year or so, wherein the much subtler distinctions of how friends and family digest trauma over time becomes the subject. It is here where the moral calculus becomes closer to what I accept as good subject matter for a film because there is no clear guiding line for the years after trauma. Something like a forgiveness can creep in, various objections and violences can happen, in a more open playing field, where the solution is not so clear, whereas for all the earlier stuff I only have this stringent assertion to the characters: seek help, seek professional help!!

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

twelfth post

A review of "The Veins Of The Earth" by Patrick Stuart & Scrap Princess,
a unique bestiary & setting book for pen-and-paper-and-maybe-skype roleplaying under the earth

You can see Patrick Stuart and Scrap Princess on their blogs, developing it; the basic premise, well suited to "dungeons and dragons", is to make it new. I think it's so new that it's not dungeons and dragons anymore; the premises is more starvation on the knife's edge of jesus-christ insanity. Well it's lamentations of the flame princess. on-message certainly.

My critical work here is all dumb, bc the fantasy text imagines a reality of play which doesn't exist yet, as far as I can tell. I keep trying to run a game on thursdays but after my last lotfp debacle idk if anyone's interested. I really can't tell if my personality is repulsive or not. I'm paranoid. I feel kinda cave-y underdarky myself and maybe that's what attracted me to Veins.
illustration of Panic Attack Jack

Because as much as innovation here in Veins there's also some pretty serious player-subversion going on, as is true LOTFP, like in the Anglerliche (fake megavillain designed to bait campaigns... The premise with the Anglerliche is that you have a fake villain bait the players and at the end of the campaign a fish eats them.) It does indeed remind me of old D&D where there would be some ideas included not out of balance but because they were experiments. Besides making things new, the other thing Scraptrick do is experiment..

((The third thing that Patrick at least does is design really over-designed megavillain characters who are all female and impossible to kill and hopelessy romantic and who looove poetry. There's two in this book (Antiphoenix and the Spectre) and then there's the Medusa. The Medusa was a lot of fun to run, though...))

I thought a whole lot about Scrap's art too. The basic thing is a diversity of methods. The work may seem juvenile bc at times it really does employ basic character-sheet doodling. Scrap has called her artwork "haphazard" for this reason (I posit).

Tho it would be a dick post if I said "wow it looks like a character-sheet doodle it must be fucking bad". This is one of those situations where there is something to be said about art. What use is a doodle. Why is a doodle useful? If something looks like a doodle can it be art? 

I mean the main takeaway from me that's really genius is that often the experience of staring into a PDF rendering of a Scrap-drawn cave hallway is that my eye picks out new details as it adjusts to the painting. Like adjusting to the darkness of an actual cave. Get that out of a splatpage. And the doodles are good, the diversity of methods create a meta-texture, appropriate you'll admit to such a hobby as ours, where _you_ might doodle on your own fuckin' character sheet... I mean that D&D is always a collage of different arts.   But moreso Scrap's work is not pandering, it feels like (in the way say, The Dungeon Master's Guide II does not feel like) a genuine work of art with multiple levels and new things to return to and a non-stupid and also interesting basis of cnxn between the form and the content.

I wish the book was bigger! I really wish this mutherfucker was A4. I want that Player's Handbook feel. Maybe we're getting there. Then again I only bought the PDF so what do I know. I'm just greedy.

Ok now I'm gonna review every monster in the book... termed "pariahs":

Alkalion: actually my favorite pariah. Good environmental storytelling, seems easy and "ready to run": In a cave of fungus and salt lies the scary lion... You branch off from a main tunnel and see a tube of salt... where does it go?

Angerlich: see above in the main review. Also this is obviously not written (exclusively) for the underdark. A fake megavillian with giant fish attached. I told my friend at a bar about this and he got worried.

Antiphoenix: see main review. basically on the edge of "runnable". Very descriptively pricey beautiful phoenix that's like a sexy death bird... a self-insert??

Arachnopolis Rex: A giant fake spider made of little spiders.  Cool, but would basically hinge on whether or not you can land that "oh shit it's actually a bunch of spiders!" moment. Which I realize the whole encounter is designed around so idk it's cool that Scraptrick are planning for unique roleplaying experiences... yes...

Archeans: Underground space aliens... roleplayable but boring(?) mbasically these guys would be cool for desperate ppl to find in a crack and have yr players slowly starve to death as they were entertained in a parlor full of fuming noxious gases... but idk the big main middle section describing them is kind of a jerk-off

Atomic Bees: "Hit one with your sword and it goes ‘clang’ and spins away." a good encounter.

Blackfoot Gigaferret: a ferret that hunts people... a good basic encounter, but also tellingly is super op, like a monster specifically designed to kill unaware players before they get a chance to react, so "subversive"... you wake up and get insta-gibbed by a ferret.

Calcinated Cancer Bear: basically as good as the Alkalion 

Cambrimen: Patrick's description of this like the makeup of their bodies really is bad. Luckily there's a Scrap illustration to show us what we knew all along: they're just big ol blob people. As with most of the civilized races down in the veins it's designed to give a problematic social encounter with unexpected benefits for those who can roll with it. This one is basically better than the others because I think it's really clear what's going on and really easy and justifiable to make this as frustrating as possible.

Castillian Caddis Larvae: Gamebreaking monster idea which will be inevitably exciting to players (it's made out of magic weapons for you to have). I actually am not excited by the design but obv players will be, so.

Cholerids: Actually one of my favorite pariahs, just 100s of these things crawling around underground, and the writing of what they're whispering is just legitimately good literature... 

One thing I should mention: you should really read at least the first third of the supercaving biography "Blind Descent" before you run your game, it really explains a lot of the core concepts (with a lot of the same language) that Patrick uses in the book. Why cave logistics are what they are, why cavers have to climb under waterfalls, what the passage through caves actually looks and feels like: "Blind Descent" is a much better primer than what Patrick conveys, or, to be fairer, really helps fill out the details.

Civilopede: The "banner monster" for the book, I get worried sometimes that when I run these games like I did with Maze of the Blue Medusa that there would be just too many good ideas and everything would seem overdeveloped and it would turn into "see what kind of good ideas Peter has (bought)" rather than whatever rpging is supposed to be. Is it genuinely pushing the genre forward or is it just a treasure trove of good ideas? There is a distinction, and minus an actual application Veins is still questionable to me. I mean I have no idea if the 4D maps are at all practical, all the other reviews basically say this too. The "Civilopede" is a literal treasure trove of good ideas, such that I might just want to have it in a relatively ordinary fantasy setting, so that it can interrupt a boring world. But suffice to say me putting a lid on everyone's imagination is unwise... how will this go?

Cromagnogolem: basically as good as Alkalion or Cancer Bear, just a solid LOTFP monster with the capacity to change your campaign forever.

Egg Dead: I think about these guys all the time.

The Eigengrau: impossible to describe, really fucked up.

Fossil Vampire: I would change things about these, like just minus the valuable organs and teeth, just make 'em Fossil Vampires. Also the backstory is ridiculous, good.

Fungal Amassodile: ok, it's probably worth mentioning at this point that perhaps the fundamental creative method of Scraptrick are puns... they will creep up on you and are difficult to pronounce and are everywhere. Your eyes adjust to the darkness and you see more and more puns. The basis of many monsters are actually puns. It's the *punderdark*

The "Fungal Ambassodile" is an overdesigned campaign-changing monster slash possible antagonist that I would say is just on the edge of "overdesigned" and is a cool idea so I have nothing to say, it's exactly what you were promised when you bought the text

Funginid Slaves: important but I hate the disconnect between the general description and the specific descriptions here and I feel like there's some ongoing pun where Patrick is trying to describe the personalities of various real-world mushrooms without letting us in on it

Gegenschein: you have a simple solution: this guy swoops in and tackles the bigger monster. It's kind of like a joke on your players. It's a giant awful angel-bug. But really the important part is the "improvisation" ability should be something the players can have somehow... they should steal it.

Gilgamash: haha dumb joke whatever

Igneous Wrath: overdesigned hard to describe and stupid to run in one package, is still a cool idea and I'm sure if you like it you'll run it, as I'm typing this I kinda want to

Ignimbrite Mite: :( no 

Knotsmen: I first really hated the knotsmen, but I've started to come around. I don't know why but it's like a character race that your players can hate so much that it will be embarrassing and shameful to them. You're supposed to push those buttons. It's their whole point...

Lamenters: squish a bird and pop out a huge bloody oily mess, everything else is pretty disposable, just remember that part

Mantis Shrimp: I don't like this one. This is pretty deep in the barrel of monster ideas, it's an invisible shrimp that will kill you. I feel like we're reading "the monster manual" at this point.

Meanderthals: terrifying archaelogical messes of monsters, maybe hard to convey, an interesting idea if one that's trying to express something fundamentally literary and not inherently relatable

Mondmilch: the "good illustration" of the book, meaning the one which will always catch your eye, every time. The encounter doesn't make fuckin' sense and should just be changed. It's designed to be changed.

Olm: Swim into a sump and see a shitload of floating, lifeless, alien bodies. It's these guys's culture. That's ok, don't explain it, and when you actually meet the "alive" ones they're friendly... and kinda hot ;)

Oneirocetacean: I forget what this one is, and it's probably a pun. Ha ha look at that fucking name. Oh ok it's the nightmare whale.

Panic Attack Jack:  one of my personal favorite illustrations (pictured above), also the description of the five-pack P.A.J. is sooo goood

Phantom Hand of Gargas: it occurs to me that Patrick needed to pad out the book with a series of metaphysical psychotrauma monsters, which have effects that can't be quite explained, which tend to interact and break with the usual methods of describing reality. This is one of those

Psychomycosis Megaspore: the preview monster that started it all... basically a good tempate for why these are all good, which is: a weird interesting face with a complex and game-breaking backstory... every monster can, as Raggi says in the outro to Slügs, "potentially change the campaign".

Pyroclastic Ghouls: realllly good imagery, ghouls sauntering upside-down through lava, that's some Fleischer Brothers shit, basically a condensed horror story, reading this is a true pleasure :

Radiolarian: ughhh what the fuck hard to describe and WEIRD TOO WEIRD. this was in Deep Carbon Observatory

The Rapture: idk how much I like how this was implemented. Good that players have the option of calling it up. I've never ran a "fighting inside your mind" kinda combat, do those work well?? All in all I feel like this coulda been simplerly written especially since it's supposed to be a game mechanic.

Scissorfish: I don't really care at this point... yadda yadda

Silichominids: really funny awesome

Sonic Pigs!: overwritten to be quite honest

Spectre Of The Bröcken: see main review

Splinterlads: One of those metaphysical monsters that patrick's doing to push the limits of what roleplaying is I guess

Spotlight Dogs: Good, cool, wildly contests the game's concepts behind "the lume" but O K.

Still-Tor-Men: drop this on your players NEXT SESSION, WHATEVER SYSTEM WHATEVER SETTING why not not hing matters

Stormsheep: I feel like this is the fifth high-concept take on what could just be a normal background creature, do you see how these start to exhaust one? Then again it's a buffet you don't have to eat it all 

Tachyon Troll: see under "Stormsheep"

Tetracharcarodron: see "Oneirocetacean" I mean I guess it's a good thing that there are some names which are parodies of how bad/complicated scientific names are. Although naming like that seems inwards-facing and jerkoffy. whatever though humor is good. Actually there's a specific blend of humor in much of the horror of LOTFP, like all of Raggi's work, Pstuart's too. Anyway I remember this one, it's a shark inside a gelatin, again high-concept but something rather attractive and lovely.

Titanskull Hermit Crab: oh man, this one just feels like a missed opportunity. There's not much at all interesting about the actual crab, and it's just got this big 'ol environmental thing, cave of skulls, all of it's kind of boring, which is a shame, because there's potential in the relatively simple concept. Maybe this is a "fixer upper" which the open-ended skull abilities table might imply!

ToRaptoise: I also really love these.

Trilobite-Knight: really the soul of the book, the golden gleam in the murk... I blush when I think of them... we need the Trilobite-Knights in reality

Ultraviolet Butterfly: man I wanna say this is overwritten. Not really, bcuz it's all relevant detail, but like ugghhh. I guess too much other stuff points to this butterfly, like the practices of the Drow, and the butterfly lantern, which is kind of the point I think (a running theses for pstuart's work is that a single detail echoes out and effects everything) but I don't need this. 

Zombie Coral: I can't even finish reading this one... exhausting

AND THE CULTURES:

AElf-Adal (drow): First part is throwaway stuff about "nightmare creatures" and second part is just that essay from falsemachine.blogspot.com that everyone loves

Deep Janeen: the good shit. the good shit

dErO: uggg I don't care
...but the pills are a good idea

Dvargir: ok their impulse to work is good because: "you see an empty extremely, insanely ornate city" is a good line to be able to back up with a culture. they're the ones building those... but the rest of it is a little too boring and unoriginal, it's not a passion project like the knotsmen.

Substratals: actually really boring! I mean there's just one central conceit which is cool that if any wizard happens to summon one of these they're in for a surprise, which is that the Xorn is actually Jack Bauer.
also concepting the center of the earth as hyper-dimensional is _great_

Gnonmen: unfortunately so bland. The real issue here is that to get to the meat of who they are you have to get past the fact that their whole deal is they have no personality. The meat is: they have weird and maybe noble values. In my campaign bad things would always be happening to them, they are the nerds in the lunchroom.

*
wait I forgot the Trogloraptor! It's is really good, and even for being high concept has a classic vibe that's universally understandable.  my applause

* * *

lastly:
this book is scary, b.c. the ideas are insane, and have merit, and it's all unique. I don't know if we're gonna run these in the future or not. It's kinda outside history-- although imagine what a (good) history it will be if we do run it!

Probably the scariest idea: navigating caves... it's hard to map let alone visually describe caves.



†full disclosure: I've communicated with a bunch of the people who worked on this book, to good and bad and middling effect (blocked by Zak, my bad)

Wednesday, June 7, 2017

eleventh post

below are some reviews for films as of late most of which I haven't seen yet.
 
WONDER WOMEN REVIEW WITHOUT SEEING IT:

major issues (predictions):
scenes where they go shopping for clothes are supposed to be funny but aren't
gal gadot can't really act (too foreign?)
the whole "olympian" thing cramps everyone's style
action is boring and dumb and wonder woman is contrived

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY VOLUME 2 I DIDN'T SEE IT:

humor is too self-parodic
chris pratt has to do scenes where he's being serious
all the dialogue is josh wheadon dialogue
baby groot is in it

boss baby:

probably a pretty good movie

alien covenant:
I saw it, it was bad

captain underpants:

it's a kids movie so it's not gonna be fun to watch also the animation looks BORING

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Tenth post

review of “tusk”

kevin smith has made some other movies probably that are like this. I couldn’t get through “clerks”. The scene introducing Veronica was like, ok, more of that fun-but-cool 90’s wholesomeness stuff that was like Slipknot. You know, not too far from the christians, kinda surburban punk.

I watched “Tusk” on the basis of: someone told me to get high and watch it, and it had the “I’m a mac” guy in it. Well suffice to say folks getting my friends extremely high and watching the film was a repeat of my usually tendency to try and force people to watch terrifying and long films. Basically there’s a scene in “Tusk” which is an editor’s joke that goes on for I think twenty-thirty minutes and it’s just one of the intro scenes of the movie.

My main takeaway that I explained to my twin high after we got home was that “Tusk” was Kevin Smith’s warning to Millenials that they were not exempt from the pain in the world. Justin Long and Haley Joel Osmont (thank god) run a podcast called the “Not-See” party, so that is like a reference to the unimaginable pain and horror that Justin Long will go through in the film. It’s like comedy for the sake of being mean, contained in the film, it’s aspirational but in a box. You get the idea.


Kevin Smith though wouldn’t say that, he would probably just be all about taking me to task over the surburban punk bit, he’s like “I’ve got friends who did fucked up stuff, I live an original life” and I’m like yeah well we’re in the biggest heroin crisis we’ve ever seen right now, people are living traumatic lives, yadda yadda, turn me into a walrus I guess.

Monday, April 10, 2017

Ninth Post

LINCOLN IN THE BARDO REVIEW

PART 1: THE METAPHYSICS

Saunders has a good premise: the voices used by civil war documentaries to read letters etc. are ghosts, who float around and have their own objectives re: their dead stories

So he (Saunders) can intermingle ghost-speak with actual civil war quotes and it's all peachy

Combine this with the pathos of Lincoln with a dead kid and you're good: this is the first half of the book

PART ii: GHOST KARATE

George Saunders doesn't know how to do the second half of a novel-length book, so he has the ghosts physically struggle with one another over the soul of dead Willie Lincoln

So the documentary-voice thing is used to display action scenes between metaphysical entities

Thus "ghost karate": we're seeing spiritual beings interact combatically as if they had physical constraints

But the wider issue is, why are we seeing this? Why aren't the concerns of the living as they ripple out thru the dead the focus? It's premises is to be a story about grief... Saunders falls back disastrously into physical struggle (between ghosts)

Simillarly the resolution of all the ghost's stories is missing something, I guess it assumes that I love these ghost characters

What I love is the Lincoln guy who isn't in La La Land and is dealing with real historic grief, the props of spirits being a means to creatively interact with that humanity

Basically the metaphysical premises is forgotten and wasted

PART III: WHAT SHOULDA HAPPENED

We should have seen Mary Todd Lincoln's death also and the compounding f/x on Abe

I don't know why the whole action had to happen in one evening... Feels rushed and overpacked

Instead of physical action resolving all this (we need to push the boy-ghost into  lincoln's body) there should have been some larger spiritual resolution*

*there was a spiritual resolution also, but I'm saying there shouldn't have been a physical one; the spiritual resolution should have brought the overall resolution

Lincoln's crisis of conciousness re: the civil war should have been played out over a longer timespan to have more development(??)

Saunders shouldn't have mistaken his characters for cute personalities who all need a beginning middle and end and instead have used them provisionally, as per their usefulness**

**the book is actually shockingly amateur at times because of this: story becomes about cutesy ghost character arcs instead of... something better like the mind of lincoln... or idk the war

PART IV: I CONCLUDE WHY I DON'T LIKE GEORGE

George Saunders is a master of putting prose together

With a few simple strokes he constructs interesting and familiar character settings

So: a civil war grave of ghosts, civilwarland (in bad decline), even the mind of a wimpy kidnapper

Famously he is able to put corporate culture pop psychology in the mouth of slavers... "Satirist" indeed...

But he doesn't have the heart to write 2 stories for one novel... he can only write "one story"

Like the telling of a joke, all the characters here conclude at the punchline... there is no "second act"

So "Lincoln in the Bardo" is an extremelly excellent novella with like a reptillian no-worky second book. I would call it a shame but I love to tear down authors. I'm a monster. 2 stars

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

eighth post

thirty reviews


fury (2014)

weak tea saving private ryan... biggest obstacle was the music score, really terribly obvious german marches and like strings amping up for the big fight... I prefer my war films to be nonplussed but this one had all the gore and some of the randomness of s.p.r. but also some pro-cynical warrior stuff incl. a hasty last stand/blaze of glory... biggest challenge was reconciling brad pitt's human rights abuses, a goal which is forgotten by the end of the film. Biggest and best scene is the middle one which is like 10+ minutes of an awkward/traumaticdinner between tom cruise and his kid and two captured german woman, basically the closest scene to being real social commentary, although this too sort of "trips over its own dick" when the kid and one german woman have sex and brad pitt is like "let them, they're young and alive" like that's supposed to be super salient. Did not watch end of film past "setting up for the blaze of glory by deciding we're all gonna die" scene.

shadow of the colossus

I first thought this game was, itself, an internal representation of the PS2 hardware. it is like a tech demo. You get the feel with wide open tracts of space with no functionality that this is like a tech demo, and the fact that there are little lizards you can shoot kind of adds to that feeling of limited or "test" functionality. By completely skipping over all the modern design trends of 1,000,000 little things to do we're instead left with an anthropology piece, the details of a culture long dead which are exposable only by conjecture. I felt like I was physically inside a realm of data.


the lobster (2015)

salient point here is that all the characters talk and act like they’re middler schoolers in a recital. Connects with metaphysical nature of the movie as parable about modern dating-- except existential bcause all relevant actors in the morality play spin off to their own consequences. At least the play seems half-interested in preserving its own moral lessons, hopefully to preserve the existential void at the center of it which bespeaks the childlike innocence of pursuing love, both deadly and salvative-- this why the middle-schooler-y speech(?)

top gun-


hellish bcuz trapped in military scenario, not real air force but an air force school, where the psychosocial tensions of the various characters get played out by cat-and-mouse games involving targeting reticule shots and bouncing and incomprehensible real fighter jet photography. Only comprehensible shot thereof is famous “middle finger” scene where Tom Cruise is flipping off opposing Russian fighter pilot while inverted above his cockpit. Also Tom Cruise pursues Kelly McGillis into a ladies bathroom to pressure her for sex.

apocalypse world (rpg)


combat is always bad bcuz designer Vincent Baker refuses to recognize combat-as-sport while all players everywhere know of literally no other mode of play. A.W. is good at builiding little post-apocalypse socities and then breaking them apart. However as the destruction is waged so too do the rules break, along the lines of “Fronts” and nefarious player advancement. Mbasically you get a cool little custom character sheet with checkboxes to fill out and then the GM asks you a bunch of questions about your sex life. Would be better if the MC (the GM) themself would get more hostile as play preceded (?)

space channel 5


Really good rhythm game, gogo eighties, immaculate aesthetic, taught me how to shame-walk-dance

tomb raider original version


achieves same sense of “quiet time” that 1.000.000 modern AAA games break apart with literal arrows on screen showing you where to go. Is much better once you find the “walk” button (you must depress this to walk and not tumble off edges). Is in MoMA, I’m pretty sure.


Basically all the simplicity of Doom or Quake levels, the library thereof being entirely compended by the common, “map design” being once a commoner’s art akin to shoemaking or coopery. You can see the sense of “place” in all these places, composed as they were mostly by a few polygons and some textures, even as they are death/doom metal alien traps. You wander through a winter cave for a while and it’s silent. Keen sense of exploration weirdly offset by 90’s obscene videogame “sex-crime” fiction aesthetic of cutscenes, glowing 3d-rendered bulbous adolescent fantasy.

the chronicles of amber


sex fantasy books from my youth. surprisingly did or did not hold up? at one point the author comments on what is obviously an ex-girlfriend of his, describing someone who gets crazy and cult-following after dating the main character.


Not really at all as powerful as Orson Scott Card’s “maps in a mirror” short story oddysy which is EXTREMELY HOT and BIZARRELY TERRIBLE, AS IN “PUBERTY AWAKENING” t.m.i

dan hoy: the deathbed editions
dan hoy poems: obviously an act of theory, more than practice, as like how would you get off on these? not super credible. But! The presentation of the book itself is so cool, perfect heft etc.


porpentine's "girl detective"
realllyy good that the girl detective dies. begins to resemble fantasia where characters are intermixed and played off each other. all for the description of the sensorium which porpentine seeks to oblige (?) porp said she was comfortable if everything she did was termed as porn, so…. this it, especially admiring guro or filth/sewage aesthetic.


house (1977)


another one of my “adolescent horror/sex” pieces, “house” is notable for being widely panned by its Japanese critics upon release. It’s there in the canon though bc the children of Nippon widely turned out to see it, an unprecedented cinematic achievement. As for being for children, the movie follows six young japanese teens who eventually get messily dismembered by a haunted house. Notable bcuz like most children’s movies there’s an element of “picnic” to it, every significant piece clashes against all the others, very punk aesthetic as well bcuz as the creator said it’s supposed to be a “cinematic reality” where the special effects aren’t designed to seem real so much as to “highlight the hard work of the crew”. So like during the martial arts scene you can see the strings lowering the hat; or like during the piano chomping scene; just google “house 1977 piano”.

the plot against america


phillip roth goes as far as to actually simulate via novel how potentially the united states could have gone fascist in 1942. Well, he almost simulates it, at the very last moment (after years of build-up) he backs off and has the Lindburgh presidential family de-escalate and America joins the war after all (on the right side). This book is immensely disappointing even for probably subtly translating the american jewish family experience on the wider immensely tragic tensions of the time-- behind every scene in the book is the reader’s knowledge of the then-unknown holocaust.  

ghost in the shell original edition vs. new?/


original edition ghost in the shell is kind of a cult film for even it’s sorta-excellent animation. “cult” because the quality isn’t consistent and the timing is sort of off and it’s clearly just the first part of a larger story. I mean american made ghost in the shell will fully abandon the plot in favor of whatever, I hope takeshi kitano’s o.k.

nicolas winding refn
people have ideas about “drive” so it’s like the intelligence of refn sorta applied well which takes a big miss on “the neon demon” and shows its own kinda joie nihilism in “only god forgives”. I mean the visual style of each film is really _not_ breathtaking except of course yeah the first scene from “drive”, many of the subsequent scenes, but like the message I keep getting (the credit sequence from demon was also _really_ good) is that there’s sort of base primality of man he wants to expose, the gravity of which I miss completely. Sure there’s x, y, and z but there’s also Ryan Gosling dragging a dude by his head, his fingers scooped in the maxilla, the image of which is enough. It’s about positioning the reader’s emotions or WHATEVER but it’s just the placid generation of these images, which is enough.


Although followup: the scenes of models bathing in blood in “demon” isn’t really awesome so I guess there is an ability to distinguish between the images that doesn’t seem contained in the films--- you see a photo album and you like some.


blood meridian


one of those important realms of history is ultraviolence and seeing the limits of horror practiced as a way of answering the dead part of your brain which requires those ideas. I sound emo here but understanding the role of the american army as a territorializing (controlling justice) force in 1887 makes america make _sense_ in a way it didn’t to me before. Like if you need to interrogate the role of mass violence and guns, as I do, plus some application to my dnd games which often become about similar acts of horrific terror.

we did porn


zak sabbath of OSR fame, who made several rpg tabletop books that I enjoy a lot, describes his experiences in the porn industry as an actor. Zak is a total knob-end in a way such as that I the reader have to deconstruct his knob-end-ness a lot because I can’t rely on the usual labels (=sexist, racist) to describe his male knob-end-ness. There is a lot of fatphobia in the book though, people are regularly criticized and characterized as monsters by their weight, so uh, point for me I guess.


Zak is continuously trying to do a Hunter S. Thompson   thing which does not profit bcuz unlike Thompson Zak  does not obliterate his own ego. To wit; Thompson stands in his own horror fearlessly calling out his paranoid/schizo responses to everything while Zak usually is the hero of his own narrative. But however at the end Zak admits some of his own deep-set fears about the morbid danger many of his friends are in, people who glance off society, and in that bit we get some of that rare “authorial humanity.” Other than though there is a whole lot of moralizing and advice-giving which turned me off.

The Story of The Eye


essential Georges Bataille “erotic” adolescent death ficiton, at times mostly exploring a few fetish ideas. Widely banned or whatever but fuses that triggering youth pain experience with craziness and legit erotic fiction. Kind of like playing around at the edges of what porn scenes can be, the feeling is of everything being especially set up to be an erotic tale but is also legitmately tripping on its own pathos.

Kathy Acker


“blood and guts in high school” was good again because it had awful youth sex stuff. I don’t know why I’m so obsessed with this; oh wait, yes I do, it’s because kids ,like in the movie “Kids” (1995), flip society on its back, have incestual relationships at least in fiction that EXPLAIN everyone’s trauma and expose for me a world I always wondered about. You can’t get to the real meaning of your high school aquaintences until you know a lot of them were drinking every morning. Or like just getting away from society’s prescribed noitons, you knowww??? That’s ART!!!


That’s what “Blood and guts in high school” is mostly about except for the poetry which “was bad”.

Delta of Venus


related to above but erotica from Anais Nin who was able to fashion up some west-bank fiction which explores ppl’s sexualities back in those days. Really powerful or whatever. Mostly as a sort of short story collection, notable for me as a flip book for sex scenes, kind of dangerously written. IDK


Eunoia
Christian Bök’s book of chapter-length poems each of which makes use of exactly one vowel each is exactly what it sounds like. The execution is chilling and I wanna prescribe to Christian’s dead-seeming personality (from what I’ve heard). More or less without moral.


The Red Pony


John Steinbeck writes a scene where Jody, a 10 year old, has to watch his steed executed, and then later has to watch a mare executed by brain-hammer so it can successfully deliver Jody’s new baby horse. Later in the book there’s a parable about education wherein a hermit coded-gay man raises a child that in his hermit-ness leads his fellow schoolchildren into new realms of imagination, later to have his and his hermit father’s life destroyed by the PTA.

The Cornelius Quartet
WEIRD Michael Moorcock four-books I got through two- about an enigmatic James Bond-type who trolls reality constantly in search of his dead incest-sister. Basically notable because the metatextual elements come in without explanation to interrupt the first novel’s normalish spy story, there’s a lot of querulous free love, and a lot of seventies tabloid moralizing. In the last book apparently it all turned out to be the fantasy lives of some London doxies, so as to create the “vertiginous imagination” of the common folk or whatever.


Almost Transparent Blue


Ok, TAO LIN wrote a review of this book, the review thereof, and especially his other review of KOKO THE TALKING GORILLA, influenced me in writing and what could be possible in a critical piece. A.T.B. is the story of some japanese hedonists not dissimilar from the characters in Story of the Eye except they’re older. They host an orgy for money, beat each other up. Mostly notable for the fact that the perspective is punk rock moral-less and sensorium-diving set of descriptions. For that reason and for the post-script which tries to reconnect with the characters (the book is auto-biography(?)) you get the sense of the sincere hedonist and thus the cnxn to everyday life, human universality etc. Also new perspective on Japanese life near a military base.

how to write a thesis


Umberto Eco lays down the rules for actual graduate study, hopelessly inapplicable to real such study, but notable because he urges people who don’t want to do the work and just get the certification to plagarism.

coeur du lion


“Ariana Reines” collection of sorta ex-boyfriend-y poems. Notable bcuz they seem pathetic, as in deserving real pity*, like she inspects her own sincere desire for the return of this asshole-y guy. A person who seems exactly like the kind of man-child widely maligned by feminist ppl today, me included(?). Sort of this inner life.



taipei


TAO LIN’s novel which is starkly boring. Notable also that TAO LIN was abusive to his ex- which is part of why Alt Lit “was violently dismantled”. His ex- isn’t in this novel, it’s more of the Megan Boyle relationship, but uh mostly notable bcuz it follows a strange kink where it bends at the end. The first part is all ceaseless reptition of drugs and emotionless descriptions of other people’s emotions but then it gets halfway emotional at the end? Why would someone want to read this (review)??

Walter benjamin: The Arcades Project


a collection of the deceased philospher’s notes preceding a never-completed magnum opus re: the paris arcades, essentially proto-malls with brothels added. Totally worth buying a copy and fer instance paging thru the chapter on gambling and prostitution which is full of wise witicisms on both, along with quoted paragraphs (also wise). Mainly a sort of library text, available as pirated .pdf . I used to be able to turn to any page and find something cool but now I strangely have lost that ability… I think it’s due to the lighting in my apartment.

Borgman (2013)


film about an “alp” which strangely enough “Alf” of “ALF” fame was also I am assuming based on-- it’s that distinctive nose, and the fur**. This “alp” is a dude like a German homeless guy who slowly insinuates a family with his evil nonsense presence. It’s sorta cool but sort of a big jerk-off because the big reveal of “Borgman”’s character really is that he’s just an “alf”. I mean I had to google what an “alf” was after the film, trying to figure out what the movie was about, and it turns out it’s just straightforward “alf”-ness.

holy motors (2012)


“Leos Carax”: vignettes following incomprehensible French logic; each vignette is good, some are stunning. Why? Mostly bcuz they are little insights into aspects of film narrative, stories that are told into the real physical actors in additon to projected thru the screen into the audience’s brains. Like this implication that the author follows the work except told longform as a movie.



it follows (2014)
MY FAVORITE CHILD/SEX/DEATH movie out since 2014!!! Why is this such a theme??! I think it’s because we’re all hung up on teenagers, our teenage years. Anyway this film is a serious attempt at rendering the fears of adolescence into a monster movie, but done with the postmodern modesty that I need wherein the characters are embodied in actual persons so the costs feel real and not horror-movie-scripted. The mysterious monster is such so we can have that half-morality play feel that “the lobster” has. This movie trades off on frenetic orgasm-end for instead a mysterious and settled dread, like a married couple has.


*not condescending pity if that makes sense

**took a look at this, I’m maybe just making it up.

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

seventh post



"OK" by Kool A.D.: A Review 


 "o.k" is about a good a book as kool a.d. says it is
like I dunno, I could read "ok" and only questionably "anna karenina"
probably if I invested the time and energy and attention span "anna k." would be a better read but it's unlikely/impossible in this stage of my life

I only really picked up "o.k." due to kool a.d. possibly occupying the zeitgeist and the writing reminding me of other alt lit efforts. "O.k." is definitely alt lit, K.A.D. often talks about being like other alt writers in the texts, shouts them out. It also has the same kinda pattern of vignettes, none of which have much conflict in them, just sort of portraits of a paradisaical life style. There's one exception where Kool A.D. has to to do a one day jail stay and it's kinda striking how it departs from the rest of the book. But at the end of that chapter MUHAMMAD X (that's the character's name) is back with his magical family.

This book had a medicinal effect on me. It's 100 chapters and I would usually sit down and read one or two and the spiritual wisdom they imparted would be real. MUHAMMAD X takes deep yogic sleeps when doesn't have energy, the continuous message is to calm down and relax, but he also indulges in drugs a lot and shoots cops. There's a pure strain of thought here (hesitant to use the word "pure" but...) which continually projects infinite peace. It's probably like a book from the seventies.

Basically I would say I was surprised by the book exactly being what I needed in my chaotic unhappiness. It was a joy to read and I was able to pick it up and get through it unlike most other books. I did not feel stressed.